Update from Inji 2017

When I was presented with the idea of completing my fellowship in renal medicine in the UK, I was overjoyed. FQMS provided me with a golden opportunity to advance my career and for that I will be forever grateful and indebted.

There are quite a few differences in medical training and practice between the UK and my homeland Palestine, which might be partially attributed to the obvious difference between developed and developing countries. Namely, there is a lack of formal training in sub-specialities in Palestine despite the massive need and demand. Statistically, the number of patients with kidney problems, failures and transplants is on the rise. However, patients usually have no other option but to be put on a long waiting list for referral to Israeli or Jordanian hospitals. If they are really lucky, they can afford to travel abroad for their necessary medical treatment, which is rarely the case.

Palestine is not short of bright minds, but it lacks resources and training facilities, which has left it in desperate need of sub-specialist physicians. I cannot begin to express my gratitude to FQMS, as their support has changed the course of my life. Had I stayed in Palestine, I would have been confined to the patriarchal society’s norms and would not have been able to advance my career in the same way due to the complex situation, specifically the siege on the Gaza Strip. The fellowship has provided me with a well-rounded experience, including both theoretical and practical experience, which is much needed in the Palestine. There is a wealth of experience in taking care of kidney patients and performing procedures, like dialysis, line insertion, and biopsies, as well as leadership and management skills. Combined together lead to improvements in treatment and the maintenance of good medical standards.

Developing my career as a nephrologist in the UK has been a great journey. This wouldn’t have been possible without the support of FQMS.